My Favorite Handmade Soap Recipe

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Why I Make My Own Soap

It started as a challenge. My wife wanted to buy this $9USD bar of soap in La Jolla California. I thought, “if there is anything different about handmade soap, there has got to be a better way than 9 bucks a bar.” While prices may vary, I have found that there is something to handmade soap. Commercial soaps are all the same even though there are a million different kinds. They all contain beef tallow, coconut oil, lye, and a bunch of fragrances and detergents. If you look at the label you will see “Sodium Tallowate” or “Sodium Cocoate”, which are just words they made up to mean beef tallow or coconut oil mixed with lye (technically saponified, but you get the idea).

Some commercial soaps will even remove the moisturizers that occur naturally in the soap making process and then sell it back to you in other products.

With handmade soap, you can control exactly what the ingredients are.

So What? Can You Really Tell a Difference?

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I can.

Since I started using my own soap, my skin has been less dry, and not itchy at all — whereas it was both itchy and dry before. I have been doing it for over a year, so I know it is not just seasonal changes or humidity. Also, I know exactly what is in my soap.

I wonder if vegetarians ever think about slathering themselves with beef tallow in the morning? Or if people who eat only organic contemplate the chemicals they are rubbing all over themselves in the shower when they use a bar of commercial soap? But again…that is another show.

The Recipe

I have tried many different combinations of oils in my soap making. I have a couple favorites. This is one of them. It is a simple recipe that fills my oval mold from Amazon.

The recipe is 100% coconut oil super fatted at 20%. It leaves your skin feeling like…well, you will have to try it. It is amazing. It is remarkably cleansing and smooth.

482 g of coconut oil
183 g of water
70.6 g of lye

Fragrance is optional.

Whatever numbers you come up with, or if you choose to use mine, double check your lye using a calculator.

Follow standard soap making instructions and enjoy.

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